July 24, 2014
culturite:

"No Trespassing" - Gregg Deal // silkscreen print: https://squareup.com/market/gregg-deal/no-trespassing

culturite:

"No Trespassing" - Gregg Deal // silkscreen print: https://squareup.com/market/gregg-deal/no-trespassing

July 24, 2014
greyeyesart:

In resistance to settler colonialism

UNITE. RISE. AND #DECOLONIZE

greyeyesart:

In resistance to settler colonialism

UNITE. RISE. AND #DECOLONIZE

July 17, 2014
Decolonize the AFN
A reminder.

Decolonize the AFN

A reminder.

June 25, 2014
Indian Unity
“inspired by the political resistance & warrior spirit of Indigenous peoples in the Americas since the onslaught of European Madness. It is a simple call for solidarity in Native America.” 
We stand together.
UNITE. RISE. AND DECOLONIZE.

Indian Unity

inspired by the political resistance & warrior spirit of Indigenous peoples in the Americas since the onslaught of European Madness. It is a simple call for solidarity in Native America.”

We stand together.

UNITE. RISE. AND DECOLONIZE.

May 22, 2014
indigenousnationhoodmovement:

Celebrate PKOLS: One Year Commemoration Thursday, May 22nd at 5pm

 (Victoria, BC)


W̱SÁNEĆ territory — Members of the W̱SÁNEĆ Nation and allies in the community will commemorate the one-year anniversary of the reclamation of PKOLS (the name of the mountain formerly known as Mount Douglas) with a community picnic on Thursday May 22, 2014.
The public is invited to gather at the base of the mountain (where Shelbourne meets Cedar Hill Road) at 5pm, walking to the summit for the picnic at 6pm.
“We want to make sure that people remember that the name PKOLS was put back on the mountain,” says Eric Pelkey, hereditary chief and treaty officer for the Tsawout Nation, part of the broader W̱SÁNEĆ Nation whose territory includes the Saanich Peninsula and southern Gulf Islands. “We want to keep it in the forefront of people’s minds. We don’t want it to be forgotten.”
“For us, it is the re-telling of the history behind the signing of the treaty. The treaty is still there. People still have rights under the treaty,” Pelkey says.
Members of the W̱SÁNEĆ Nation are working with other Coast Salish Nations and indigenous and non-indigenous allies to commemorate PKOLS and other indigenous place names in the territory.
“The thunderbird is a spiritual entity,” says Charles Elliot, an artist, carver and community activist from Tsartlip Nation who designed the thunderbird on the wooden sign installed at the PKOLS summit in a ceremony attended by 800 people on May 22, 2013. “It is a high-up symbol which we think is fitting for the action that we are taking. The thunderbird symbolizes the importance of what we are doing.”
People are welcome and encouraged to attend the community picnic on Thursday May 22nd.
For further information, please contact:
Eric Pelkey, Tsawout Nation, 250-480-8526Charles Elliott, Tsartlip Nation, 250-652-9564

Download the announcement here and spread the word.
Use the #PKOLS hashtag on social media to share your photos, videos and solidarity!

DECOLONIZE VICTORIA. SUPPORT THE RECLAMATION OF OUR SACRED NAMES AND PLACES.

indigenousnationhoodmovement:

Celebrate PKOLS: One Year Commemoration Thursday, May 22nd at 5pm

(Victoria, BC)

W̱SÁNEĆ territory — Members of the W̱SÁNEĆ Nation and allies in the community will commemorate the one-year anniversary of the reclamation of PKOLS (the name of the mountain formerly known as Mount Douglas) with a community picnic on Thursday May 22, 2014.

The public is invited to gather at the base of the mountain (where Shelbourne meets Cedar Hill Road) at 5pm, walking to the summit for the picnic at 6pm.

“We want to make sure that people remember that the name PKOLS was put back on the mountain,” says Eric Pelkey, hereditary chief and treaty officer for the Tsawout Nation, part of the broader W̱SÁNEĆ Nation whose territory includes the Saanich Peninsula and southern Gulf Islands. “We want to keep it in the forefront of people’s minds. We don’t want it to be forgotten.”

“For us, it is the re-telling of the history behind the signing of the treaty. The treaty is still there. People still have rights under the treaty,” Pelkey says.

Members of the W̱SÁNEĆ Nation are working with other Coast Salish Nations and indigenous and non-indigenous allies to commemorate PKOLS and other indigenous place names in the territory.

“The thunderbird is a spiritual entity,” says Charles Elliot, an artist, carver and community activist from Tsartlip Nation who designed the thunderbird on the wooden sign installed at the PKOLS summit in a ceremony attended by 800 people on May 22, 2013. “It is a high-up symbol which we think is fitting for the action that we are taking. The thunderbird symbolizes the importance of what we are doing.”

People are welcome and encouraged to attend the community picnic on Thursday May 22nd.

For further information, please contact:

Eric Pelkey, Tsawout Nation, 250-480-8526
Charles Elliott, Tsartlip Nation, 250-652-9564

Download the announcement here and spread the word.

Use the #PKOLS hashtag on social media to share your photos, videos and solidarity!

DECOLONIZE VICTORIA. SUPPORT THE RECLAMATION OF OUR SACRED NAMES AND PLACES.

May 20, 2014
Reform or Revolution: Art at the Left ForumMay 30 - June 1, 2014 | New York City
Building Revolutionary Indigenous Movements for Decolonization through Music, Art and Digital Media
Performance, Art, Video and Media: Demonstrating Protests of the 21st Century
Reproducing Indigenous Culture as a Means of Resistance
En(d)Gendering in Hip Hop
DECOLONIZE THE REVOLUTION.

Reform or Revolution: Art at the Left Forum
May 30 - June 1, 2014 | New York City

DECOLONIZE THE REVOLUTION.

May 20, 2014
"Your generation has been colonized by electronic media and technology, has atrophied in capabilities that a previous generation perfected, and surrounded itself by a culture of flakiness. YOU MUST DECOLONIZE."

Fred Ho (composer/musician/activist)

May 20, 2014
"The fugitivity of Indigenous art in struggle is not a flight from battle or a defensive, reactionary posture against the predation and violence of colonialism. As Collins…argues, the violence and broken promises of colonialism are what fuel the resurgence of the ‘warrior energy’ of the people, funneling it into creative contention with the limits of colonial modernity. Fugitivity finds its energetic potency in remaining illegible to power, incommensurable with colonialism, and opaque to appropriation, commodification and cultural theft. That which is fugitive proposes an insurgent force of dissident visibility; it is the hidden that reveals itself in motion. The fugitive aesthetic is thus an overflowing of borders and bordered-thinking, a liminal praxis whose generative effects activate art in a transversal re-presencing of indigeneity throughout Indigenous lands, languages and territories. The cultural and aesthetic production that emanates from these positions is a strategic motion of refusal: to evade capture, resist cooptation, and renew Indigenous life-ways through the creative negation of reductive colonial demarcations of being and sensing. In this way, Indigenous art contributes to decolonization by disrupting colonialism’s linear ordering of the world and its conditioning of possibility. Art creates experiences of potentiality that inspire and sustain our collective struggles for freedom; Indigenous art reminds, remembers, and calls out to us to account for colonial injustice, and to realize the potential freedom found in our creative transformation of the world."

"Fugitive indigeneity: Reclaiming the terrain of decolonial struggle through Indigenous art" - Jarrett Martineau & Eric Ritskes

May 20, 2014
NEW ISSUE: Decolonization Journal - “Indigenous Art, Aesthetics and Decolonial Struggle”
Guest co-edited by Jarrett Martineau, Cree/Dene, University of Victoria (culturite x rpmfm)
Featuring contributions from: Leanne Simpson, Luam Kidane, Brandy Nālani McDougall, Sandra Collins, David Winfield Norman, Celeste Pedri-Spade, Jenell Navarro, Susy J. Zepeda, Jade E. Davis, Susan D. Dion, Angela Salamanca, Wanda Nanibush, Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández.
And interviews with Rebecca Belmore, Tania Willard, Tom Greyeyes, and Walter Mignolo.
Cover art: “Yikáísdáhá” by Tom Greyeyes (Diné). Follow him on Tumblr: greyeyesart  
Check out this amazing issue featuring Indigenous media, art, music and activism in struggle!
DECOLONIZE YOUR READING LIST.

NEW ISSUE: Decolonization Journal - “Indigenous Art, Aesthetics and Decolonial Struggle”

Guest co-edited by Jarrett Martineau, Cree/Dene, University of Victoria (culturite x rpmfm)

Featuring contributions from: Leanne Simpson, Luam Kidane, Brandy Nālani McDougall, Sandra Collins, David Winfield Norman, Celeste Pedri-Spade, Jenell Navarro, Susy J. Zepeda, Jade E. Davis, Susan D. Dion, Angela Salamanca, Wanda Nanibush, Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández.

And interviews with Rebecca Belmore, Tania Willard, Tom Greyeyes, and Walter Mignolo.

Cover art: “Yikáísdáhá” by Tom Greyeyes (Diné). Follow him on Tumblr: greyeyesart 

Check out this amazing issue featuring Indigenous media, art, music and activism in struggle!

DECOLONIZE YOUR READING LIST.

May 14, 2014
Free City Radio II zine

freecityradio:

free city radio zine graphic

Free City Radio II focuses on cooperative social and economic systems. As the crisis of neoliberal capitalism becomes more and more apparent, as the voracious environmentally destructive practices of extractive industries, like the tar sands in Canada, move to becoming the key to contemporary “economic development”, the necessity of alternative economic and social systems become more and more urgent. As people work to oppose these destructive practices of capitalism, we also need to focus on and reflect about possible collective ways to create a more sustainable society.

This zine includes a long article by Dru Oja Jay examining the state of the cooperative movement in the U.S. which also appears here on The Media Co-op. Also this zine includes original interviews with Darrin Qualman, activist, writer and long time associate with the National Farmers Union of Canada. In this zine Darrin speaks on the history of agricultural cooperatives in the prairie region of Canada, specifically in Saskatchewan.

Also in this zine is an interview with indigenous scholar and media activist Jarrett Martineau, offering an indigenous perspective on cooperative economics, looking at both post and pre colonial methods of indigenous social and economic organization as alternatives to the destructive wrath of corporate capitalism now voraciously attacking Mother Earth.

This edition of Free City Radio also includes art work by Bec Young from the Justseeds Artists’ Cooperative, drawings by Sylvia Nickerson and graphics via Decolonizing Media. Cover design is by Stefan Christoff remixing an M. C. Escher piece, interior layout / printing via KataSoho and the silk-screening printing by Jesse Purcell from Justseeds.

The second issue of Free City Radio is now available at the following local Montréal bookshops:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Bookstore
211 Rue Bernard Ouest
Tél : 514-279-2224

Concordia Community Solidarity Co-op Bookstore
2150 Bishop Street
Tél : 514-848-2046

The Word Bookstore Montreal
469 Rue Milton, Montreal
Tél : 514-845-5640

Argo Bookshop
1915 Sainte-Catherine St W, Montreal
Tél : 514-931-3442

Librairie Le Port De Tête
262, av Mont-Royal E
Tél: 514-678-9566

Monastiraki
5478 St Laurent Blvd, Montreal
Tél : 514-278-4879

Decolonizing media at work.

SUPPORT.

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